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October 01, 2013

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twitter.com/fearlesscomp

Best in the Industry goes right to your famous line "No one cares about your products and services except you."

It's Gobbledygook words, David. Conveys nothing.

Jeff Ogden

David Meerman Scott

Thanks Jeff - you're right of course!

Ann Bevans

So true. Why should your prospect care about your industry? What does that do for him? All he cares about is the value you're providing, right now. Whether you're selling him a product or service, providing him with useful information, or telling him a great story, as long as you're delivering value, you've already won.

David Meerman Scott

Ann - "Why should your prospect care about your industry?" Exactly! They don't It's an example of inward thinking. Thanks for the comment.

Tom Borgman

Old world marketing gimmick holdover for sure. "Best" is the word these geniuses think will resonate, stick with and most amazingly, move prospective customers to take action. To most perceptive/skeptical buyers, who already perceive so many duplicative/competing companies touting best this best that...like me...it actually is a call to ignore, run away and never consider the company touting it!

David Meerman Scott

Tom - Old world indeed. I also ignore organizations that say "best".

Words2wow

This is a great way of refocusing the problem. I usually say "If it is clearly the best, everyone would buy it." People buy what is best for them which depends on a large number of factors, not the one or two product specs that the company chooses to call out.

Your point about a comparison customers weren't looking to make is brilliant.

Michael Kaye

Pardon the cliché, but the exception proves the rule. The situation in which saying your “the best” works, is when the audience already believes, or is at least inclined to believe.

There was a time when the standard concert intro for the Grateful Dead was, “Ladies and Gentlemen. The very best, the Grateful Dead!” If most any other band were introduced that way the audience reaction would have been, “Who says?”

You might ask, “If they already believed it why bother to say it? I’m pretty sure it was not a conscious thing at the time, but I think the intro was effective because it prompted the believers to tell their friends that the Dead were not only “groovy, far out, and right on,” they were “the very best.” I’m not sure if David would agree, but his very valid stricture against “the best” claim applies much more to when suppliers say it about themselves than it does to when customers say it to suppliers.

David Meerman Scott

Michael, This is so interesting. Many thanks for jumping in. I love how you've defined the idea that when somebody already believes that something is the best, that a reinforcement works. But so many companies use that "best" language as simply hype.

Jose Palomino

Such truth. "The best in the industry" doesn't answer the customer's questions, "But what will that do for ME?" Where is the value for the customer with that phrase?

joost g

all a bit bs for me.
i want a service. and i want the best. not medioker or 'the cheapest'.
and i want fighters.
when a company dares claiming to be the best - that's the one I'm looking for.

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