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July 12, 2010

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Mike July

A few years back a local prominent journalist reported falsely that a couple of MSU alums attended a basketball game. It turned out that they were supposed to attend, but for whatever reason they did not. The article, written in advance of the actual event, was never corrected before publication.

The writer took a lot of heat for it and almost resigned. The thing is, it was just a faulty detail in an otherwise factually accurate story. Yet he was nearly ostracized for it.

We'll have to wait and see if CBS News loses any credibility over this.

Raj Khera

David, what's interesting is that it looks like CBS used their CMS to edit the story now to read that Spain indeed won.

However, they left the tweet count, digg count, and comments up from the earlier version. So, when you read the comments on what is now the correct story, you see people reacting to their mistaken post, http://www.cbsnews.com/8601-500290_162-6668199.html?assetTypeId=30&tag=contentBody;commentsStandAlone

Someone over at CBS still doesn't get it :-(

Remco Janssen

Hi David, great post. Thanks! What worries me also is that CBS has no intention of ever saying sorry for their mistake. I mean, I guess over one million (rough estimate, but hey, someone has to do it ;-) people viewed this article. If not more.

Make mistakes well. I guess that doesn't count for CBS. I find that an appallingly arrogant behaviour of a trusted news organization. There is no excuses for that, don't you think?

Simon Croft

Oh the power of social media, if this had been at the last world cup it probably wouldn't have been as much of an issue.

I agree with Remco though, it does show the arrogance and their holier than tho attitude. God forbid, they could even use it as a bit of humor and show their lighter side (if indeed they have one).

David Meerman Scott

Simon & Remco - Yeah, they could have used the opportunity to laugh at themselves. But it seems they just completely ignored the gaffe.

My guess is the bosses don't follow social networking and the staffers just didn't want to take responsibility.

Janeile

Is there any wonder why I have a hard time saying "trusted" and "news source" in the same sentence?

culture news

The writer took a lot of heat for it and almost resigned. The thing is, it was just a faulty detail in an otherwise factually accurate story. Yet he was nearly ostracized for it.

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